Microsoft BI – 2015 Highlights

It’s been a great year for BI! Power BI coming of age,  exciting SQL Server 2016 CTP releases and a maturity in the cloud for analytics, data science and big data.

For me Power BI is the biggest news of 2015. POCs ran in H1 of 2015 found it wanting. Basic functionality missing and the confusion of wrapping it in Office 365 made it to much for businesses to consider. However with the GA release, and the numerous updates, it had finally delivered on its vision and given Microsoft an end to end, enterprise solution, for the first time in its history; including multidimensional connectivity!

Microsoft also made some great tactical manoeuvres including the purchase of Datazen and Revolution R as well as their excellent Data Culture series. Datazen is a good tool in its own right with great dashboard creation capability and impressive mobile delivery functionality on all devices/platforms. It will nicely integrate to SSRS top deliver a modern reporting experience via mobile in SQL 2016. R is the buzz of 2015, a great statistical analysis tool that will really enhance SQL Server as the platform of choice for analytics as well as RDBMS. In fact you can already leverage is capability in Power BI today!

Cloud. So Microsoft finally realised that trying to drag businesses into the cloud was not the correct strategy. A hybrid approach is what is required. Give businesses the best of both worlds. Allowing them to benefit from their existing investments but “burst” into the cloud either for scale or new capability, as yet untested. SQL 2014’s ability to store some data files, perhaps old data purely kept for compliance,  is a great example of this. ExpressRoutes ability to offer a fast way to connect on-premises with cloud is brilliant. Or go experiment with Machine Learning, made Microsoft simple by the Azure offering.

For me I was also scored to see the PDW hot the cloud with Azure SQL Data Warehouse. An MVP platform is the closest my customers have needed to be to BigData but the initial outlay of circa half a million quid was a bit steep. With the cloud offering companies get all the benefits worn a minimal investment and an infinite ability to scale. But do consider speed of making data available as it could be limited by Internet connections.

So in summary an awesome year for Microsoft BI with the future looking great! I still feel Microsoft lack SSAS in the cloud but perhaps Power BI will gain that scale in 2016. Overall I envisage seeing Microsoft as a strong leader in the next Gartner quadrant release for BI and I can’t wait for SQL 2016’s full release!

The future (2016 at least) is bright, the future is hybrid cloud…

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MS BI Current World

Datazen and Windows 7

Are you using Windows 7? Stuck on it for the foreseeable? IT will NOT let you be part of the test group for Windows 8.1 or 10? Then consider carefully any decision to utilise Microsoft Datazen.

Datazen is a great, simple, dashboarding and visualisation tool that is available as part of your SQL Server Enterprise, Software Assurance, agreement. It is a relatively simple tool which offers brilliant mobile delivery via iOS, Android and Windows. Datazen has connectors for lots of sources including Analysis Services. Client access is FREE and there is no cloud involvement, unless you host the Datazen server in Azure, but even then you could configure it so no data is persisted in the cloud!

My first customer who is using Datazen and Windows 7 called me in last week to help troubleshoot some potential show stopping issues they are having with the tool. The issues are to do with the Windows 7 Publisher application and creating, publishing and editing dashboards with Windows Authentication to a standard SQL Server.

The Windows 7 application is in preview: http://www.datazen.com/blogs/post/datazen-publisher-for-windows-7-preview-now-available and available to download from Microsoft. The “preview” tag is an interesting one as you may think that this would have been done ages ago…

However, after digging around the history of Datazen, it is clear that this release was an afterthought following the products acquisition by Microsoft in April 2015. The original product was only released in 2013 and was the baby of a team of people that previously gave us ComponentArt. According to their background over 40k people have been using the tool since its release and both Gartner and Forrester mentioned the product. However, I was not alone in the BI community, that had never heard of it.

Being released in 2013 means they definitely didn’t think about designing a front end to work with Windows 7. In fact, by the time of Datazen’s published release date Windows 8 had been in general release for over a year. So there is no way this product was built to work with Windows 7.

But back to the issue. My customer was really excited about the ability to have a BI tool that would enable them to create rich visualisations that could be accessed by up to a 1000 users for free! If you ignore the cost of a SQL enterprise license and appropriate SA! They sensibly set up a test server (two actually but the server design can be discussed at another time) and got the Windows 7 client installed on the MI team’s laptops. Their data source is a very simple SQL Server data set storing 100s of rows of summarised data.

The MI got about the relatively easy business of creating dashboards. However, the next day they tried to edit dashboards themselves (from the server, not the local copies) or other users tried to just view the dashboards, using the Windows 7 application, and they wouldn’t open. Even local dashboards couldn’t be re-published to the server.

The led to some serious concerns that they had made the right decision to use this tool. It seems the Datazen, Windows 7, application loses the connection to the Datazen server, sporadically. This can be spotted by the failure to be able to publish or by a small icon (apologies no screenshots as I don’t have a Windows 7 VM to recreate locally) under the connection name that shows the BI hub on that Datazen server. By removing and then adding the connection again the MI team are able to publish.

We also found that this wasn’t a network or security issue as if the same users browsed (using Chrome or IE) to the Datazen server they are able to view the dashboards that simply wouldn’t open in the Windows 7 application.

So we have a temporary workaround. Keep re-creating the connection in the Windows 7 application and use the browser to actually view dashboards. Luckily there are NO end user issues as they will NOT be using the Windows 7 application to view, they will be using iOS app or direct through browsers.

Finally, we did manage to test some scenarios using a spare Microsoft Surface that was running Windows 8.1. There were no issues!

In summary you should be wary of using this product with Windows 7 and be mindful of the fact that the product wasn’t built for Windows 7 and for the best experience you do need to be on a later version of Windows. This shouldn’t detract from Datazen being a fantastic option for a BI tool. It is free and doesn’t touch the cloud, something that a lot of my customers are very excited about!

Just to note we are raising the issues with Microsoft, but at the moment it is not clear if there are plans to do a full, non-preview, release of the Windows 7 application; given that Windows 7 is still the most used OS I hope so! I will keep you updated.